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Announcement DH Event on campus Speaker Series

Niall Atkinson and Team to Visit in March

We are excited to share the news that Niall Atkinson, associate professor of art history at the University of Chicago, will be visiting next week accompanied by his DH team member Carmen Caswell, Digital Humanities Research Liaison.

Professor Atkinson will deliver the Pamela H. Simpson Lecture in Art History on March 11 at 5 p.m. in Northen Auditorium.

In addition to the lecture, Atkinson and Caswell will visit classes and collaborate with members of the Florence As It Was team.

Learn more about their visit over at The Columns.

Categories
Announcement Event on campus Pedagogy

Digital Pedagogy Discussion Series – Winter Edition

We’re back with another round of Digital Pedagogy lunches!

Are you curious about digital pedagogy methods but aren’t sure where to start? Do you enjoy hearing from colleagues about what’s worked in their classes? Do you need to eat lunch? 

To guide our conversation, we’ll use Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments by the Modern Language Association. This resource is organized by keywords – each one is a pedagogical concept with annotated artifacts of curricular material. A faculty volunteer has selected a keyword of their choice and will be facilitating the discussion. Lunch is on us! 

Here’s the plan: grab your lunch from the designated lunch location (let them know you’re with the DH Cohort) and head down to DH Workspace (Leyburn 218). We’ll eat, chat, and hopefully come away with new ideas for your classroom.  It would be great if you could let Mackenzie Brooks, DH Librarian, know that you’re coming.

Keyword: Praxis
Facilitator: Mackenzie Brooks, Library
Tuesday, February 4th, 2020
12pm-1pm
Lunch location: Marketplace

Keyword: Annotation
Facilitator: Caleb Dance, Classics
Monday, February 17th, 2020
12pm-1pm
Lunch location: Marketplace

Keyword: Archive
Facilitator: Ashley Lazevnick, Art History
Friday, March 6th, 2020
12pm-1pm
Lunch location: Marketplace

Categories
Announcement Event on campus Pedagogy

Digital Pedagogy Discussion Series

Are you curious about digital pedagogy methods but aren’t sure where to start? Do you enjoy hearing from colleagues about what’s worked in their classes? Do you need to eat lunch? 

The Digital Humanities Faculty Cohort is hosting a new discussion series on digital pedagogy! 

To guide our conversation, we’ll use Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments by the Modern Language Association. This resource is organized by keywords – each one is a pedagogical concept with annotated artifacts of curricular material. A faculty volunteer has selected a keyword of their choice and will be facilitating the discussion. Lunch is on us! 

Here’s the plan: grab your lunch from the designated lunch location (let them know you’re with the DH Cohort) and head down to DH Workspace (Leyburn 218). We’ll eat, chat, and hopefully come away with new ideas for your classroom.  It would be great if you could let Mackenzie Brooks, DH Librarian, know that you’re coming.

Keyword: Mapping
Facilitator: Melissa Vise, History
Tuesday, November 19th, 2019
11:45am-1pm
Lunch location: Cafe 77

Keyword: Failure
Facilitator: Sydney Bufkin, Library
Wednesday, December 4th, 2019
11:45am-1pm
Lunch location: Marketplace

Keyword: ?  Facilitator: you?  Let us know if you’d like to run a discussion in 2020!

Categories
Announcement DH Event off campus

CFP: Chesapeake Digital Humanities Consortium

The newly-formed Chesapeake Digital Humanities Consortium will be holding its first conference on February 21, 2020 at William and Mary. The Call for Proposals is now live! Learn more on the CDHC website. Proposals are due January 6th, 2020.

Catherine Knight Steele, Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of Maryland – College Park and Director of the Andrew W. Mellon funded African American Digital Humanities Initiative (AADHum), will be keynoting.

The Chesapeake Digital Humanities Consortium (CDHC) is an association of people and institutions committed to the cooperative development of teaching, learning, research, and community partnerships in the digital humanities. Because place and space shape collaboration, CDHC is focused on supporting digital humanities in the D.C, Virginia, and Maryland region.

CDHC has three guiding goals:

  • Identifying, developing, and communicating opportunities for members to pursue the digital humanities.
  • Building accessible, diverse, and equitable digital humanities communities.
  • Fostering sharing, collaboration, and innovation among people, places, and institutions.

Categories
Announcement Event on campus Pedagogy People Research Projects

Winter Academy 2018 — rescheduled!

[FYI this event has been rescheduled for January 16, 2019 from 12:15pm-1:15pm. Join us for the same great lineup! Please register on Event Manager.]

With a fresh snow and impending finals, it is certainly time to look toward Winter Academy offerings. The entire line-up looks great this year, but we invite you to join us for the following DH event:

Monday, December 10th, 2018
12:15-1:15pm
Hillel 101
Lunch provided

Digital Humanities Summer Research Panel
Curious about how “digital humanities”–whatever that means–can fit into your research? What it’s like to work collaboratively with undergraduates working on humanistic questions? What impact the research can have on your pedagogy? Then, you should hear from Mellon Summer Digital Humanities Faculty Research awardees and a Special Collections project.

Presenters: George Bent, Professor of Art History; Sydney Bufkin, Mellon Digital Humanities Fellow; Megan Hess, Assistant Professor of Accounting

Don’t forget to register at http://go.wlu.edu/winteracademy!


Looking to fill out the rest of your week? We recommend the following:

  • Leveraging Technology to Cultivate an Inclusive Classroom – Kelly Hogan and Viji Sathy (UNC Chapel Hill), Monday at 9:15-10:45pm
  • Imaging in the IQ Center – Dave Pfaff, Monday at 2:15pm
  • How is Technology Affecting Your Mojo? Finding Mindfulness – Marsha Mays-Bernard (JMU), Wednesday at 2:30-4pm
Categories
Announcement DCI Event on campus

Rewriting the Code: Women and Technology–Join Our Creative Technology Cohort!

Apply to the Creative Technology Cohort, and attend Fall Workshops!

Join us this year as we explore opportunities at the intersection of technology and the humanities. Our Fall Workshops will introduce the Creative Technology Cohort to the basics of web development and programming in a relaxed and supportive environment. The Winter Forum will feature Chelsea Barabas as the Keynote Speaker and breakout sessions following her talk.


Workshop #1: How the Web Works
Saturday, October 6th at 10:30am-3:30pm
IQ Center

Participants will learn the basics of web design, HTML, and CSS. They will also get their own web domain so they can start working on a personal or professional website. This workshop will be run by Katherine Donnally. Lunch is included. Apply to the Cohort to attend.


Workshop #2: Coding 101
Saturday, October 20th at 10:30am-3:30pm
IQ Center

This workshop will serve as an introduction to computing and Python. No experience is necessary for either workshop. Coding 101 will be run by Zoe LeBlanc out of UVA Scholar’s Lab. Lunch is included. Apply to the Cohort to attend.


Keynote Speaker: Chelsea Barabas
Friday, March 1st at 5-6pm

Chelsea Barabas studies the role of data and algorithms in the US criminal justice system and writes and speaks on gender and diversity in technology. She works with communities around the world to examine how technology can serve the public good.

Check out the Women and Technology website to learn more! If you have questions, e-mail Sydney Bufkin at bufkins@wlu.edu and Kellie Harra at kharra@wlu.edu.

Categories
Announcement DH Event on campus Incentive Grants Pedagogy Speaker Series

Day of DH at Fall Academy 2018

DH @ W&L is holding two Fall Academy sessions this year. Don’t forget to register and check out all the other amazing-looking sessions. Join us on Thursday, August 23rd, 2018 in Hillel 101 for the following:

10:45AM-11:45 AM Creating Open Course Websites
Course websites are a great way to increase access to your courses, share your teaching strategies and materials with colleagues, and organize information for your students. Creating a course website is also an opportunity to re-evaluate the structure of your class and imagine how a student will navigate the different parts of the course. Learn about the benefits of making course materials open and accessible to audiences beyond the university, hear how other people in DH are using course websites, and learn strategies for organizing your own course into an easy-to-navigate website.

Presenters: Sydney Bufkin, Mellon Digital Humanities Fellow; Mackenzie Brooks, University Library; Sarah Horowitz, History.

12:00 PM – 1:45 PM DH Incentive Grant Panel
Come learn about DH funding opportunities for research and the classroom. Hear from current grant holders how they incorporate DH tools and methods in their classrooms. Presenters include Paul Youngman, Chair of Digital Humanities; Ricardo Wilson, English; Shikha Silwal, Economics; Stephen Lind, Business Administration; Stephanie Sandberg, Theater.

Come learn about DH funding opportunities for research and the classroom. Hear from current grant holders how they incorporate DH tools and methods in their classrooms. Presenters include Paul Youngman, Chair of Digital Humanities; Ricardo Wilson, English; Shikha Silwal, Economics; Stephen Lind, Business Administration; Stephanie Sandberg, Theater.

Categories
Announcement DH

DH Opportunities: Apply Now!

Check out these two DH opportunities! Apply for an internship with the Center for Hellenic Studies or apply for the Lisa Lena Opas Hänninen Young Scholar Prize:


CHS Summer Internship in Digital Humanities

The Center for Hellenic Studies is looking for interns to work for eight weeks on the Free First Thousand Years of Greek Project, a self-standing subset of the Open Greek and Latin Project in Washington D.C. Find out more information here. Apply now!

Application Deadline: February 14, 2018
Internship Dates: June 1-July 27, 2018


The goal of the Free First Thousand Years of Greek Project is to make freely available the corpus of the first thousand years of Ancient Greek as attested in manuscripts. The project aims to incorporate a modern search engine, the ability to download works, the capacity for including textual variants, and numerous other features.

Interns will work primarily with XML files, editing them to meet the project’s standards, and uploading the corrections to a GitHub repository. Additional tasks will include correcting OCRed texts, as well as contributing to other digital humanities projects as they arise.

Undergraduate students majoring in any field may apply. One semester of ancient Greek is required; intermediate knowledge of ancient Greek is strongly preferred. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required. No prior professional experience is necessary for this internship. Interns will be trained in all necessary technologies. Applicants must demonstrate the internship’s relevance to their studies and future career plans.

The CHS does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion (creed), gender, gender expression, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status in any of its activities or operations.


 Lisa Lena Opas Hänninen Young Scholar Prize

The Lisa Lena Opas-Hänninen Young Scholar Prize is sponsored by the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations, awarding $1,829.32 in prize money. Find out more information about the opportunity here.

Deadline: October 1, 2018


A winner of a Lisa Lena Opas-Hänninen Young Scholar Prize must be a student, graduate student, or a postdoctoral researcher who has contributed in a significant way to scholarship at a humanities conference using digital technology essentially. She or he cannot be a scholar with an academic position, whether tenured or untenured.

An author may be considered a “young scholar” for purposes of this award by being for example: aged 35 years or less at the start of the conference; in an entry-level academic appointment at a university or junior position in an organization involved with Digital Humanities; and new to Digital Humanities from another discipline or career.

Apply now!

Categories
Announcement

Applications are open for the Post-Baccalaureate Fellow in Digital Humanities

Are you a W&L senior or recent graduate with an interest in the Digital Humanities? Would you like to build technical and professional skills, gain career mentorship, and help make DH programming at W&L even better? Are you excited about expanding opportunities for women in technology? Applications are now open for the one-year Post-Baccalaureate Fellow in Digital Humanities, a full-time job at the University Library starting in June, 2018.

Position description:

The Post-Baccalaureate Fellow in Digital Humanities is a one-year position designed for a recent college graduate who will assist the Washington and Lee Digital Humanities (DH) initiative in preparing undergraduates majoring in the humanities and humanistic social sciences for technology-based careers or graduate education. The position will give particular attention to developing activities, resources and workshops that encourage undergraduate women to expand interest in applying coding, software and digital research methodologies to their studies and careers beyond W&L. The Post-Baccalaureate Fellow will receive significant mentoring and professional development in preparing for future graduate study or career opportunities.

The position is full-time and will start in June, 2018. The application deadline is Feb. 1, 2018. Apply here.

Categories
Announcement DH Event on campus Speaker Series

Days of DH @ Winter Academy 2017

The 2017 Winter Academy is here! Check out the Days of DH events:


Valuing the Digital Humanities at a Liberal Arts Institution

Wednesday, December 13, 2017
12:15pm – 1:45pm
Hillel House 101
Please register here.

Viewed by some as a promising future for traditional humanities teaching and scholarship, the Digital Humanities (DH) is nevertheless difficult to define and often subject to harsh critique. In this presentation, Dr. Seán McCarthy of James Madison University sidesteps the field’s more controversial aspects and instead examines how a DH program might fit with the goals and values of a liberal arts institution. He will also brainstorm different strategies to formalize Washington and Lee’s already vibrant DH presence into a sustainable programmatic and curricular effort.

McCarthy is an assistant professor in the School of Writing, Rhetoric and Technical Communication at James Madison University, and his teaching and research are situated at the intersection of community engagement and digital literacy studies. He is particularly passionate about better understanding how writing, digital media, and interdisciplinary collaboration serve to build creative university-community partnerships. McCarthy currently serves as a university Entrepreneurship Faculty Fellow at JMU, and he also co-teaches an annual institute for faculty in digital humanities pedagogy. In 2017, he and collaborator Mollie Godfrey won the award for Best Community-University Project at the Conference on Community Writing for their work on “Celebrating Simms: The Story of the Lucy F. Simms School.”


DH Summer Research Panel

Thursday, December 14, 2017
12:00pm – 1:30pm
Hillel House 101
Please register here.

Curious about how “digital humanities”–whatever that means–can fit into your research? What it’s like to work collaboratively with undergraduates working on humanistic questions? What impact the research can have on your pedagogy? Then, you should hear from the Mellon Summer Digital Humanities Faculty Research awardees:

  • Clover Archer, Director of Staniar Gallery
  • Drew Hess, Associate Professor of Business Administration
  • Sarah Horowitz, Associate Professor of History
These events are made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.