Sara Sprenkle, Associate Professor of Computer Science, and Paul YoungmanAssociate Professor of German, taught this project-based course, which introduced non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) majors to the use of digital technologies in humanities research and research presentation. The course was predicated on the fact that the digital turn the world has taken in the last several decades has drastically changed the nature of knowledge production and distribution. To call this turn a revolution is not an exaggeration. The class involved “talking” and “doing;” it integrated lectures on digital humanities (DH) and computer science with demonstrations of fully developed DH projects by guest speakers culminating in thrice-weekly lab sessions. At the beginning of the term, the lab sessions gave students hands-on experience with new tools and techniques but later evolved into inquiry-based, student-designed group projects in DH. 

Students in this course produced two projects:

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